aplaceforart:

simply stated but oh so wise!

aplaceforart:

simply stated but oh so wise!



typette:

womanistgamergirl:

Dude.
Denny’s is calling out Coachella.
Dude.
Dude.
Denny’s dude. Wow.


now if that doesn’t make you wanna eat at fuckin denny’s

typette:

womanistgamergirl:

Dude.

Denny’s is calling out Coachella.

Dude.

Dude.

Denny’s dude. Wow.

now if that doesn’t make you wanna eat at fuckin denny’s


annmariebrok:

the second photo. THE SECOND PHOTO.


"

[…] Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

"

Ray Salazar, Mexican etiquette some white people need to learn on dad’s 77th birthday.

Saluden Muchachxs, saluden.

(via frijoliz)

For reaaaaal. 

(via uncachitodemicorazon)


Some kids in Miyamoto’s neighborhood made his day without knowing it.



themindislimitless:

themindislimitless:

kosmonaunt:

Fatima Al-Fihriyya Art Nouveau by *Nayzak

Excerpt of Meet Fatima Al-Fihri - An Inspiration:

Twelve hundred years ago, under the Islamic State, a woman named Fatima Al-Fihri lived to make life for her community better and was a woman with a vision. She was from a prestigious family and had inherited a fortune from her father. As a young, wealthy and well educated woman her interest was neither in shoes or handbags, nor in any celebrity lifestyle, neither to woe a man for marriage, nor in any of the stereotypes that are usually associated with us women folk. There was depth in this woman, she had a vision that was cultivated and allowed to grow because of the Islamic society she lived in and encouraged her. Her vision did not remain a dream but was accomplished and the results can still be seen today. In 859, Fatima Al-Fihri founded the oldest academic degree-granting university existing today, the University of Qarawiyyin in Fez, Morocco.
The Al-Qarawiyyin Mosque is one of the largest Masjids (mosque) in Africa and one of the world’s oldest universities. Al-Qarawiyyin is the perfect example of how Islam combines the spiritual with education and that Islam is not separate from life’s affairs. This is not only an example of how education and religion merge in this small corner of the globe, but it sheds light on the esteemed role that women played in the Islamic community - an aspect of Islam that is often misunderstood. Furthermore, during medieval times it was regarded as being a major intellectual centre in the Mediterranean. Its excellent reputation even led to Gerber of Auvergne studying at the mosque. Auvergne later went on to become Pope Sylvester II and has been given the credit of introducing Arabic numerals and the zero to the rest of Europe.

Although Fatima Al-Fihriyya is an inspiration and a powerful symbol of empowerment for many Muslimahs, she is also a sad reminder of how much the Muslim community over the world has disintegrated from their ideals. Where women once were encouraged, and actually took high places in society and did many amazing things both for their time and the generations that would come after, the women in present day society have been subjected to years of oppression from a patriarchy that wants them “in their place”, of governments, rulers, systems that seek only to exploit them and make money for themselves while leaving behind and trampling down on the ones who enabled them to be great. Well, woman have great minds and are capable of great things, and our “place” is out in the world. It is out and doing things that matter, it is out and changing the world, it is doing things that we have a right to do, and it is a matter for every woman to reclaim those rights.
THIS is what Islam means for women to do. Know your rights.

I see this post going around and people talking about how there’s nothing on her on Wikipedia, so I’m reblogging this for that excerpt up there for people to start on her. And then continue reading up on her here.

themindislimitless:

themindislimitless:

kosmonaunt:

Fatima Al-Fihriyya Art Nouveau by *Nayzak

Excerpt of Meet Fatima Al-Fihri - An Inspiration:

Twelve hundred years ago, under the Islamic State, a woman named Fatima Al-Fihri lived to make life for her community better and was a woman with a vision. She was from a prestigious family and had inherited a fortune from her father. As a young, wealthy and well educated woman her interest was neither in shoes or handbags, nor in any celebrity lifestyle, neither to woe a man for marriage, nor in any of the stereotypes that are usually associated with us women folk. There was depth in this woman, she had a vision that was cultivated and allowed to grow because of the Islamic society she lived in and encouraged her. Her vision did not remain a dream but was accomplished and the results can still be seen today. In 859, Fatima Al-Fihri founded the oldest academic degree-granting university existing today, the University of Qarawiyyin in Fez, Morocco.

The Al-Qarawiyyin Mosque is one of the largest Masjids (mosque) in Africa and one of the world’s oldest universities. Al-Qarawiyyin is the perfect example of how Islam combines the spiritual with education and that Islam is not separate from life’s affairs. This is not only an example of how education and religion merge in this small corner of the globe, but it sheds light on the esteemed role that women played in the Islamic community - an aspect of Islam that is often misunderstood. Furthermore, during medieval times it was regarded as being a major intellectual centre in the Mediterranean. Its excellent reputation even led to Gerber of Auvergne studying at the mosque. Auvergne later went on to become Pope Sylvester II and has been given the credit of introducing Arabic numerals and the zero to the rest of Europe.

Although Fatima Al-Fihriyya is an inspiration and a powerful symbol of empowerment for many Muslimahs, she is also a sad reminder of how much the Muslim community over the world has disintegrated from their ideals. Where women once were encouraged, and actually took high places in society and did many amazing things both for their time and the generations that would come after, the women in present day society have been subjected to years of oppression from a patriarchy that wants them “in their place”, of governments, rulers, systems that seek only to exploit them and make money for themselves while leaving behind and trampling down on the ones who enabled them to be great. Well, woman have great minds and are capable of great things, and our “place” is out in the world. It is out and doing things that matter, it is out and changing the world, it is doing things that we have a right to do, and it is a matter for every woman to reclaim those rights.

THIS is what Islam means for women to do. Know your rights.

I see this post going around and people talking about how there’s nothing on her on Wikipedia, so I’m reblogging this for that excerpt up there for people to start on her. And then continue reading up on her here.


thefrogman:

primesdontparty:

here-have-some-feels:

thefrogman:

For all your emergency blogging needs. 

Where’s my emergency blog robot?

An awesome addition to my post. Very cool.


fuckyeahillustrativeart:

pxlbyte:

Monument Valley is Out Today!

Written by Elliott Finn

Remember that stunning, Escher-inspired puzzle game for iOS that you saw the trailer for a few months ago? Well, you can play it right now!

(Click here for the full article)

image

Reblog / posted 1 day ago via akainv · © pxlbyte with 16,181 notes